Posts in Coaching Philosophy
Individualized Training Programs are Overrated

If you’ve followed me on social media over the last few years you’ve probably struggled to keep up with where I’ve worked. I’ve lived in multiple states over the last 3 years and have worked in multiple positions, all with their own unique environment. I’ve worked in the private sector at a facility that trains athletes of all sports and also at a facility that specializes in baseball training. I’ve also worked in the team setting at the professional level. This blend of experience has helped me develop a unique lens in which to view programs, training philosophies, and general industry trends. In fact, I would encourage all young coaches to seek out opportunities in different environments within the industry to gain a better feel for the industry as a whole and to be able to discern the positives and negatives of each environment. 

One industry trend that’s blown up in recent years is the push towards individualized training programs. Now, before I go into detail on my opinion on this trend I want to make it clear that I don’t think this is a bad trend by any means. The idea of individualized training programs by itself is just a logical idea that has gained traction because it just plain makes sense. However, I can also see the flaws in how this trend has been executed for the most part. This observation is directed largely at the private sector, but I also want to make it clear that this observation is not directed at any coach or program specifically. I understand the danger in criticizing a program or coach without fully knowing the context of what they’re doing, how they’re doing it, who they’re doing it with, and why they’re doing it, so I want to be very careful with this blog post and make it a point to state that these observations are in the most general sense possible and that there are most definitely programs and coaches that do a fantastic job of implementing intelligent, productive, individualized programs for their athletes.

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